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Organizers promise ‘bigger, better’ MLK Parade in 2021

Last week’s inaugural Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day Parade is just the beginning of new tradition for the Camellia City, say its organizers.

Robert Blankenship, president of the event’s sponsor group, Butler County Concerned Citizens, said the first parade honoring the slain civil rights leader in Greenville drew an impressive 70 entries from seven counties.

“We had participants not only from Butler County, but Lowndes, Montgomery, Wilcox, Marengo, Crenshaw and Conecuh counties, in this historic MLK Day parade,” Blankenship said.

He is also proud of the fact the inaugural parade had, not one, but two grand marshals.

“Willie Mae Robinson is well known here as a retired educator and a historian,” Blankenship said. “She has opened the Black History Museum in her home in Greenville to many students over the years. And Eugene Parker served as a civil rights activist and actually marched with Dr. King. It was only fitting that we have both these fine individuals serve as our first grand marshals.”

Blankenship and the Butler County Concerned Citizens promise that the 2021 edition of the MLK parade will be “even bigger and better.”

“We appreciate all who participated and who attended the parade and thank everyone who played a part in making this historic event happen,” he said. “Remember, it’s hard to be what you can’t see.”

Butler County Concerned Citizens is a non-profit organization founded in September 2017. Their stated mission is “to provide assistance to the citizens of Butler County in order to enhance the quality of life, provide greater opportunities and to prepare our youth to become responsible and successful adults. Through cooperation with our city and county government, school agencies and affiliates, and law enforcement, we intend to make Butler County a better place to work and live.” 

For more information about BCCC, visit their website at www.butlercountyconcernedcitizens.org or call (334)
312-9898.