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Wild hogs workshop a success

Demonstrators at the workshop showed attendees the latest technology in the trapping and ridding of wild hogs. Submitted Photo

By: Shayla Terry

The Feral Hog Control and Management Workshop hosted by the Crenshaw County Extension office showed the agricultural threat that wild hogs face to their business, and how to remedy the problem.

“It was very informational,” Crenshaw County Commissioner Michelle Stephens said.  “I did not realize that we had such a hog problem in this county, much less in the state. “

Though not indigenous to the United States, feral hogs have established populations in at least 36 states, with problems reported in the southeastern states.

“They are a species that the population is a constant reproductive cycle,” said Alabama Extension Regional Agent Bence Carter, who spoke at the event.

Wild hogs have the potential to reach sexual maturity as early as six months of age, with litter sizes averaging about six piglets. Females can become pregnant twice a year.

According to Carter, the animals cause about half a billion dollars worth of agricultural damage nationwide.

“If you look at Alabama, you’re looking at 30-50 million dollars worth of damage,” Carter said. “Just from those number you can tell how bad of an issue it is. We wanted to bring awareness to the options available to control these animals.”

The animals feed on plant matter, like mast, roots, and agricultural crops, as well as small animals.

The workshop is held in Crenshaw County once a year. More than 50 people attended the workshop.

“We had a great turnout,” Carter said. “Crenshaw County is one the counties that we consider a hot county when it comes to wild pigs.

Attendees were taught about trapping pigs as a well as utilizing cameras, and decoys to rid of the pests.

If anyone has the opportunity to kill a hog or pig please do so,” Stephens said. It will help the county’s agriculture in a lot ways, and save everyone money.