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Brantley hosts 5th annual Letterman Hunt

This past weekend the Brantley High School Letterman Foundation held their 5th annual Letterman Hunt. Hunters from all across the nation gathered in Brantley to meet, greet, eat and hunt. A total of 45 participants showed up and the group had 32 kills in all.

This past weekend the Brantley High School Letterman Foundation held their 5th annual Letterman Hunt. Hunters from all across the nation gathered in Brantley to meet, greet, eat and hunt. A total of 45 participants showed up and the group had 32 kills in all.

By: Shayla Terry

Though the weather wasn’t the best, Brantley High School’s 5th annual deer hunt still saw great results.

“We had about 45 hunters register, but we fed over 200 people during dinner,” BHS Principal Kris Odom said.

“It was a super time for fun and friendship.”

The deer hunt is one of Brantley’s top fundraisers. Hunters enter the competition for $750, which includes all of the hunter’s meals.

“We provide meals for them, but they always are eating extra,” Odom said.

“So, they go to restaurants in the community. It’s a boost for the economy of the whole county for that weekend.”

The hunt is sponsored largely by Brantley’s Letterman Foundation. The foundation determines how the funds will be used to supplement various needs at the school.

“The Letterman Foundation is a group of people from Brantley that have pledged their allegiance to help the betterment our school,” Odom said.

“We have people in the foundation that are athletic oriented, and people who have been former teachers and librarians.”

Hunters come from various states to participate in the fundraiser. Participants hunt on land owned by various members of the Brantley community.

“We have a lot of people from down in Miami, Louisiana and Tampa,” Odom said.

“They come for a long ways just to enjoy the time with us.”

The deer hunt has grown in number over the past five years. In its first year, there were only nine participants. This year the 45 participants had 32 kills.

“It’s a yearlong process for us to plan for it,” Odom said.

“We spent a lot of time planting food pods, setting up stands, and preparing for all of our guest.  We feel like we have a quality product with the comradery that we’ve built, and the hometown atmosphere that people get to experience, which they may not be used to.”