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Sheriff’s Office begins safety inspections around county

According to Crenshaw County Sheriff Mickey Powell,  many establishments in Crenshaw County that have their liqor license are not up to code on fire safety and crowd control.

According to Crenshaw County Sheriff Mickey Powell, many establishments in Crenshaw County that have their liqor license are not up to code on fire safety and crowd control.

In recent County Commission meetings, it was brought to the attention of the commissioners that complaints had come in regarding the Waterin’ Hole bar, located on HWY 331 between Highland Home and Luverne. These complaints, however, have not just been a recent issue.

According to Crenshaw County Sheriff Mickey Powell, the establishment has been open for over 20 years and has undergone multiple ownerships. In the time it has been open, Powell has had many calls to the establishment.

“As long as I’ve been in law enforcement, that place has always been an issue. There have been people cut, shot and stabbed there,” he said.

“About six months or so ago, we had a call of a fight and shots fired there. To this day, we’re still getting complaints about it.”

Based on the recommendation of Powell, the Commission decided it was in the best interest and safety of the citizens to pull the business license from the Waterin’ Hole.

“The recommendation of the Sheriff was that the facility itself and the way it was being managed was posing a threat to our citizens,” said County Commission Chairman Charlie Sankey, Jr.

“At his recommendation, being that he had had multiple calls there, we pulled their business license. Therefore, by the Alabama Alcoholic Beverage Control (ABC) Board’s criteria, you can’t have a liquor license without a business license.”

Powell noted that these measures have not just been taken on the Waterin’ Hole, but have also been implemented at other establishments in the county that hold a liquor license.

“There are some things in the works from the Sheriff to make sure that all of these places that are operating as night clubs in our county are up to fire code specifications,” Sankey said.

“I think they are doing that now. That’s law enforcement, and that’s what we expect them to do is to keep us safe.” Over the next few months, Powell and his office will continue to inspect establishments around the county to ensure the buildings and licenses are updated and up to code.

“We’re checking all the places that holds beverage licenses in Crenshaw County. We’re going around and checking these places to make sure the buildings actually meet the safety codes,” Powell said.

“If there’s anything wrong with the buildings, we’re telling them what they have to fix to meet the safety and fire codes. We want the people that go there to know that if they do go there and something happens, they can get out safely.”