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New childcare facility opened in Luverne

Angel Strickland has lived in Crenshaw County her whole life, and knew from a young age that she was meant to work with children. Lil’ Explorers held a ribbon cutting event recently, and the establishment opened Aug. 8.

Angel Strickland has lived in Crenshaw County her whole life, and knew from a young age that she was meant to work with children. Lil’ Explorers held a ribbon cutting event recently, and the establishment opened Aug. 8.

The most recent addition to the Friendliest City in the South recently hosted an open house and ribbon cutting event.

Lil’ Explorers  Childcare Center officially opened its doors for business on Aug. 8, and owner Angel Strickland is excited to see what is in store for her.

Strickland was born in Georgia and moved to the area when she was a child, but has called Crenshaw County home her entire life.

Since her youth, Strickland has had a passion for children and knew that in some way working with them was her calling in life.

“As I was growing up, I loved kids. This is just something that I felt was what I should do,” she said.

“I’ve been in college for a while, and I got my degree. I thought I might want to be a teacher, but that changed. The good Lord just directed me to do this, and that’s where I’m at now.”

Strickland attended LBW Community College MacArthur Campus in Andalusia and earned a degree in child development.

While there may already be a few day care centers in the area, Strickland hopes to bring something new to the table.

Not only will the facility be a day care center, but it will also offer children the opportunity to get a head start on their education before attending kindergarten.

“I think that a good, well-rounded and developmentally appropriate day care would be best here,” she said.

“I hope to give them a better education on their level, so they are prepared for kindergarten.”

Lil’ Explorers will offer a daily schedule for the children which encompasses lessons as well as play. Strickland hopes to introduce children to letters, numbers and writing their names, along with other social, cognitive and emotional lessons.

“It’s not just the sitting down and learning how to color, it’s the whole all around thing,” she said.

Currently there are about seven on staff, and there are hopes of expansion in the future.

The facility will host infants to five-year-olds, but will potentially accept older children later on.