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New downtown store offers unique treasures

Darryl and Melinda Freeman enjoy hunting for dusty treasure.

As the couple’s antique collection grew, so did their desire to turn their hobby into a business.

On Wednesday, the Greenville Area Chamber of Commerce held a ribbon cutting for the couple’s new antique store, Lolly’s Attic, which is located on West Commerce Street in downtown Greenville.

“We liked to treasure hunt and as our collection grew, we realized the need for the type of shop we offer,” said Darryl. “We decided to open a local store because we saw the need for an antique shop in Greenville and also a means to display our products.”

The store isn’t a typical antique store, according to Darryl.

Greenville Mayor Dexter McLendon and members of the Greenville Area Chamber of Commerce helped welcome Lolly’s Attic to town with a ribbon cutting ceremony Wednesday. The business is owned by Darryl and Melinda Freeman and managed by the couple’s daughter, Amberlin Salas. (Advocate Staff/Andy Brown)

Greenville Mayor Dexter McLendon and members of the Greenville Area Chamber of Commerce helped welcome Lolly’s Attic to town with a ribbon cutting ceremony Wednesday. The business is owned by Darryl and Melinda Freeman and managed by the couple’s daughter, Amberlin Salas. (Advocate Staff/Andy Brown)

“We don’t want to be a typical antique store,” he said. “We have definitely put our own twist to it. We would like to have a broad array of items from large furniture pieces to small collectible items. Our goal is to do a great deal of sales on our website and other online venues. We are currently working on our website where all of our items will be showcased and available for purchase.

“We also carry a great section of new products including vintage inspired items and furniture to new home décor and gift items. Our goal is to have something for everyone. Our product line will be ever expanding and evolving.”

Darryl said there are already some very interesting items in the store, such as a 19th century Chinese gaming box with mother-of-pearl hand etched gaming pieces, and a functioning 1926 Singer electric sewing machine.

“Many of our items have come from auctions, estate sales, and wherever we can find a treasure,” Darryl said. “We want to place things in the store that are commonly collected, but also unique items as well. We also want to have things that people may want to use in their everyday life.”

Darryl said the store will also offer the option of consignment for those looking to sell their items.

The Freeman’s daughter, Amberlin Salas, is the store’s manager.

For more information visit the store’s website, lollysattic.com, or call (334) 617-3234.