• 77°

Roby rolls to victory

Martha Roby scored a decisive victory on Tuesday in the Republican primary for the Second Congressional District to earn her fourth term in office.

Roby, a Montgomery native, received nearly 67 percent of the vote.

Becky Gerritson, the founder of the Wetumpka Tea Party, garnered 27 percent of the vote, while electrician Bob Rogers received nearly 6 percent of the vote.

Roby received nearly 74 percent of the vote in Butler County.

“This win matters because it sends a message about who we are going to be as a party in Alabama, and what being a conservative means here today,” said Roby.

Roby credited her overwhelming victory to showcasing her record of putting Alabama’s interests over the political interests in Washington, D.C. She cited her work to support the military installations in the district, delivering a new Farm Bill that benefited Alabama agriculture, successfully outlawing federal coercion in education, and working to expose corruption at the VA and starting the process of turning it around.

“We have worked to solve problems, and, in this campaign, we let that work speak for itself,” said Roby. “I have always believed that if you listen to the people, work hard, and keep your priorities straight, politics takes care of itself. And, in Congress, my priority is this: Alabama always comes first.”

Roby had received criticism from her challengers for being part of the “Washington establishment” and doing too little to curb wasteful spending.

Roby countered by telling voters she is “a conservative who wants to solve problems, not cause problems for conservatives.”

Roby thanked the voters for their trust and support, saying the strong win showed voters were choosing “solutions over sanctimony, progress over pessimism, and results over rage.”

“Today, Alabama voters have honored me – not just with their vote – but with their blessing and with a mandate to fight for conservative solutions,” said Roby.

“Too often, politics gets in the way. Too often, when it comes to decisions that affect the lives of people right here in Alabama, the politically expedient thing to do wins over the right thing to do.

“Whether it’s in Washington or Montgomery, too many politicians are so afraid of losing their job that they forget to do their job. Well, not this girl. Tomorrow, we’re back to work. There’s so much to do.”