• 37°

Sink manufacturer shutters doors

After nearly two decades of manufacturing acrylic sinks in the Camellia City, which were then shipped nationwide and internationally to stores such as Lowe’s and Ace Hardware, CorStone Industries has closed its doors. (File Photo)

After nearly two decades of manufacturing acrylic sinks in the Camellia City, which were then shipped nationwide and internationally to stores such as Lowe’s and Ace Hardware, CorStone Industries has closed its doors. (File Photo)

After 16 years in Greenville, CorStone Industries has closed its doors.

Owner Sam Roberts confirmed the closing on Friday.

The company’s last production day was in March, but the business remained open to ship inventory.

A recording on the company’s voicemail says, “The CorStone offices are closed. The manufacturing plant has cancelled all existing orders and at this point is not accepting new orders.”

“It’s sad,” Roberts said. “We’ve spent many wonderful years here. We’ve made over 4 million kitchen sinks here at this facility. We’ve had some really good, loyal employees and most of them have already found jobs at other places. Those employees, some that have been with us since we moved to Greenville, made this a difficult decision.”

Roberts said the business, which at one time employed 135 people, had in recent years employed 45.

Corstone, which relocated to Greenville from its home base in Massachusetts in 1999, was the first company to produce a cast acrylic sinks. The company had produced nearly 100 models of cast acrylic sinks in its 60,000 square-foot manufacturing facility located in Greenville’s Industrial Park. The sinks were then shipped nationwide and internationally to stores such as Lowe’s and Ace Hardware.

“For several years, CorStone has experienced declines in volume and profit margins due to cheap, alternative imported products and most recently had encountered market resistance to products containing the chemical raw materials used in our manufacturing process,” Roberts said. “We concluded that the CorStone business model is no longer viable from either a financial or operational perspective.”

Roberts said there has been interest from other businesses in the building that’s located along Industrial Drive.

“I think it will be occupied very quickly, and the jobs that were lost will come back,” Roberts said.

CorStone’s equipment will be auctioned off in the coming weeks as the company continues what Roberts described as an “orderly shutdown.”

Roberts said he and his wife plan to remain in Greenville and will continue to be active supporters of the Greenville Police Department, Butler County Sheriff’s Office, the school system and other organizations it has help financially support over the years.

“We’re very fond of Greenville,” Roberts said. “Coral and I will still live in Greenville. It’s our home. We’ll still be a part of the Greenville community. We’ll just be part of the retirement community now.”