Pink Ladies honored for hospital service

Published 7:37 pm Monday, April 14, 2014

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Between the nine active volunteers at Crenshaw Community Hospital, the group, most commonly known as “The Pink Ladies,” has given more than 6,500 hours of service to staff and patients.

“I count it a privilege to come down here,” Pink Ladies secretary and treasurer Teresa Foster said. “I get a blessing from the patients and I hate to miss my blessing.”

On Tuesday, hospital staff arranged a brunch honoring the Pink Ladies for the work they do at the hospital, including Easter-themed wreaths, table settings and a large pink cake.

Bonnie Trotter, Director of Volunteers with the hospital, said in the 26 years she’s worked there, she has “never had one complaint about a Pink Lady.”

The Pink Ladies, referred to as such because of the pink scrubs they are seen wearing as they walk through hospital halls, ate, laughed and shared stories as they celebrated their own achievements. The event, Trotter said, was the hospital’s celebration of National Volunteer Week.

Foster said the Pink Ladies hope more will be interested in joining their ranks in the coming years. She said numbers have been dwindling, but the ones who are still active are very active.

“Right now we just about have enough for one person to come each weekday,” she said.

Pink Lady Roberta Money said the ideal would be double the current rotation.

“We used to have two in the morning and two in the afternoon,” she said. “It was fun to work with someone else, and it means you’re able to do much more.”

The work itself is easy, Money said, but it is difficult to serve patients and not be able to help them medically.

“You just go in patients’ rooms and ask what they need. If they want to talk, you talk with them, if they want to pray, you pray with them.”

Most shifts are two hours long and only once per day.

Trotter said the group was important to the hospital’s daily work.

“The Pink Ladies are very special to this hospital,” she said. “They do so many things for the patients, the visitors and the employees.

“They bring great joy to the entire facility.”

She said the pins given to the Pink Ladies in their honor summed up her feelings. The pins read, “Volunteers are shining stars.”

Of the currently active Pink Ladies, Foster said, the following number of hours have been worked at the hospital:

Alice Curtis, 2594 hours.

Sharon Norman, 1402 hours.

Roberta Money, 916 hours.

Gwen Johnson, 480 hours.

Missy Folmar, 434 hours.

Teresa Foster, 384 hours.

Wilkie Payne, 241 hours.

Dorothy Bodiford, 88 hours.

Joyce English, 45 hours.

Trotter said the hospital is always willing to accept new volunteers and will explain the role to anyone who might be interested.

The only things a person needs to volunteer, Foster said, is the physical ability to walk through the halls and carry items to and from patients’ rooms, and a willingness to work.

“We want them to want to do it, not feel like they have to do it,” she said.”

Foster said the group will also accept monetary donations from those who are unable to donate their time.

The money is used to purchase equipment or items for the hospital when budgets are tight, as well as provide aid for hospital staff during times or personal crisis.

Trotter is the contact for arranging donated funds, as well as those interested in becoming Pink Ladies. She said those interested should call her at 334-335-1213.