Greenville has a new computer technician

Published 5:04 pm Thursday, September 2, 2010

Computers, like the humans that invented them, are far from infallible. Getting one repaired can be a frustrating process, sometimes involving shipping the computer across the country if you are covered under a warranty of some sort.

But Scott McCrory wants to make that process as painless as possible.

McCrory is the proprietor of Greenville’s newest business, Scoles Computer Services, LLC, which is located at the old Butler Services Building next to W.O. Parmer. When his wife Shannon, daughter of Joanne and Mickey Coleman, decided she wanted to move back closer to home, McCrory decided to open another computer shop like he owned in Decatur, Ala.

“We looked at this area and realized that it had a need for this service,” McCrory said. “We wanted to branch out, and with my wife’s roots being around here, we though this would be a good location.”

Although Scoles will not offer warranty repairs for other computer manufacturers, they will offer a plethora of computer services at affordable prices, McCrory said.

“A broken computer is unfortunate to begin with,” McCrory said. “Nobody wants to get an old system repaired that costs more than buying a new system.”

Any computer problem, from hardware to software to networking, can be handled at Scoles Computer Services, McCrory said.

“I have been in the business since 1983 and was a computer programmer for fourteen years, so I can do anything as far as a diagnostician is concerned,” McCrory said. “I always do free diagnoses, too, because I feel like I can diagnose a machine within 15 minutes or so.”

After determining the problem, McCrory said he calls the customer to tell them their options before proceeding with work. If he replaces a part, he will give it back to the customer so they know exactly what he replaced. If a new computer is unavoidable, however, Scoles offers custom-built and refurbished systems for purchase.

“All our systems are guaranteed and the prices are phenomenal,” McCrory said. “And even though they have a 30-day warranty, if something goes wrong after 32 or 33 days, I’ll still honor the repair.”

Computers, he laughed, sometimes have a bad habit of breaking immediately after their warranty expires.