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Schools offer tutoring, remediation to improve graduate numbers in county

Some area seniors will need to be hitting the books a little harder if they want to get a diploma in May.

Joseph Dean, interim superintendent of Butler County Schools, gave his report on the status of seniors in the county’s three public high schools at last Thursday’s BOE meeting.

The statistics are as follows:

*Greenville High School – total number of seniors – 162; total meeting requirements to receive exit document – 89; total not currently meeting requirements for exit document – 73; total who have passed all parts of the grad exam – 100 and total who have passed three parts of the grad exam – 28, with 13 AOD students.

*McKenzie High School – total number of seniors – 34; total meeting requirements to receive exit document – 30; total not currently meeting requirements for exit document – 4; total who have passed all part of grad exam – 28; total who have passed three parts of the grad exam – 1 and 1 AOD student.

*Butler County Magnet School: total number of seniors – 44; total meeting requirements to receive exit document – 39; total not currently meeting requirements for exit document – 5; total who have passed all parts of grad exam – 30; total who have passed three parts of the grad exam – 6, and a total of 4 AOD students.

County-wide totals are 240 seniors, with 158 meeting requirements to receive exit document; 82 not meeting those requirements, 158 who have passed all parts of the grad exam and 35 who have passed at least three parts of the grad exam, and a total of 18 AOD students.

Each of the high school principals was asked to come forward and share what their schools were doing to rectify the situation.

Dr. Charles Farmer, principal of Greenville High, said having students participate in credit recovery classes was the first step.

“We do a lot to help better prepare our students. Extensive tutoring has been going on for four days a week since February 1,” Farmer said.

“We are not only offering plenty of opportunities to our seniors for remediation, but across the board.”

Randy Williams, principal of McKenzie High, said two periods a day provided math and reading remediation for students in need of assistance at his school.

“We also have a committee analyzing data to help us determine where we need to focus our intervention. We don’t have that many students (needing remediation), but we’d like to get them all,” Williams said.

Jennifer Burt, interim principal at Butler County Magnet School, said classes within the normal school schedule were being offered “every single day” in remediation for all junior and senior classes at BCMS.